Skip to content

MCHC

About

MCHC (mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration) is the average concentration of haemoglobin in your red blood cells. Haemoglobin is a molecule which allows red blood cells to transport oxygen around the body.

What might a low result mean?

MCHC is looked at in the context of your other red cell blood markers. If your other markers are normal then a slightly low MCHC level may not be significant.

Low levels of MCHC can be caused by anaemia, when the body is not producing sufficient haemoglobin. Anaemia can be caused by iron deficiency, which can be caused by not intaking enough iron in the diet, or from conditions such as Crohn's disease where the intestines are unable to absorb sufficient iron.

Anaemia can also be caused by chronic bleeds, such as peptic ulcers, and inherited disorders such as haemolytic anaemia.

What might a high result mean?

MCHC is looked at in the context of your other red cell blood markers. If your other markers are normal then a slightly high MCH level may not be significant.

Elevated levels of MCHC can indicate the presence of spherocytes (a type of red blood cell with too much haemoglobin) or a deficiency of folic acid or vitamin B12 in the diet.

=